Frankenstein: Post I of III

An Aside

 Front piece to the 1831 edition of Mary Shelley’s  Frankenstein  depicting Frankenstein and the Creature.

Front piece to the 1831 edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein depicting Frankenstein and the Creature.

Over the course of the next couple weeks, I will be using this space (along with the spaces of two other blog posts) to analyze, study, and contextualize the purpose and application of Frankenstein Digital Humanities projects already in progress. This process will allow the pursuit on the conceptualization of the text, how different digital versions of the text impact how we read it, and how this serves as a tool to interpret the text.

By looking at how different archives, sites, and projects have formatted the text, or via plain text, we can begin to interpret how the text performs when read all together or separately, and how this performs within our own analysis of the text.


The Texts

Below are listed some of the different digital versions of the full 1818 text available for public consumption. They are categorized based on how they present the text, either collectively or separated either by paragraph, letter, or chapter: